Nelson and Colne College wins Skills Award for its outstanding GCSE resit provision

Nelson and Colne College has been named as Provider of the Year in the Skills Awards 2020 for its outstanding GCSE resit provision.

The college, which is first and third nationally in performance tables for the progress students make in Mathematics and English GCSE resits, has been announced as the coveted category winner of the Skills Awards 2020.

Judges found that the college displayed excellence and effectiveness in Mathematics and English learning outcomes, in deciding on the winning nomination.

Nelson and Colne College has consistently been the leading college in the country for GCSE Mathematics progress for three consecutive years, and in that time has always been in the top three places nationally for GCSE English progress too.

In 2018, Nelson and Colne College was named as a Maths Centre for Excellence to support improvement in the college sector. The college has also been approached to support English and Mathematics improvement with Newcastle Colleges Group, and speak on the topic of GCSE provision at the Association of Colleges’ Annual Conference.

Assistant Principal for Academic Curriculum at Nelson and Colne College, Fionnuala Swann, said: “I’m thrilled that we have won this award for our GCSE provision. While we are well-known for our outstanding A Level, vocational and Apprenticeship provision, we also offer exceptional GCSE resit provision and support for those students who do not quite achieve their target first time around.

“The sustained success in GCSE resits is a result of a whole-college approach to improving Mathematics and English, combined with a range of other factors including exceptional teaching, engaging lessons, rigorous monitoring and assessment of student progress and innovative collaboration work with secondary schools in Pendle.

“By recruiting and developing a passionate, knowledgeable and enthusiastic English and Mathematics teaching team who are committed to improving teaching and learning, we really are best placed to kick start a student’s progression onto a high quality, career aligned study programme at College, and then onto university, an Apprenticeship or employment.”

Nelson and Colne College is the number one FE college in the country for A Level progress, and is number one in Lancashire for 16-18 Advanced Apprenticeship timely completion. In addition, the College is also number one in the country for student satisfaction, based on the latest FE Choices Learner Survey.

Applicants looking to apply to Nelson and Colne College still have the time. If you would like to apply to study at Nelson and Colne College, contact 01282 440272 or visit www.nelson.ac.uk

If you are looking for a career at Nelson and Colne College Group, please visit the college’s designated careers website at careers.nelson.ac.uk/

Highly successful Burnley FC programme to launch at Accrington and Rossendale College

The highly successful Burnley FC Shadow Youth Team programme that mixes football skills and academic study is coming to Accrington and Rossendale College from September.

Benefiting both male and female footballers aiming for a career in the industry or wider sports coaching and performance sector, the programme’s launch is part of a campaign to bring the extraordinary to Accrington and Rossendale College, after its merger with Nelson and Colne College – one of the leading colleges in the country across a range of academic measures.

Since the BFC Shadow Youth Team launched with Nelson and Colne College in 2015, 408 young people have completed the programme, with a further 32 completing the female equivalent, the Girls’ Post-16 Academy.

Last season, 117 students studied on the programme, and alongside their BTEC qualification, 28 Shadow Youth Team graduates secured their FA Level 1 Football Coaching award. Players have progressed onto impressive destinations both in the UK and overseas including university, employment, Apprenticeships, semi-professional and professional football.

The launch also comes at a time where the campus at Accrington and Rossendale College is undergoing £4 million of improvements, to ensure students have access to the best industry standard facilities to help them develop vital skills for their future.

Steven Buckley, Head of Division for Sport at Nelson and Colne College Group, said: “I’m delighted at this development, and it brings a high-quality, established programme with a track record of positive results to strengthen the vocational offer at Accrington and Rossendale College.

“The practical element of this full-time programme is delivered by an experienced team of UEFA licensed coaches, while the academic element is delivered by our brilliant teaching team within the Nelson and Colne College Group.

“As a student on the Burnley FC Shadow Youth Team – male or female – you can not only expect the highest quality of training from industry experts, but also a wide range of fantastic opportunities to enhance your learning, leading on to exciting futures.”

Olivia Riley, 17, is one of the existing female Girls Post-16 Academy players on the Burnley FC programme. She said: “I’ve played football from the age of 10, and this programme is absolutely perfect for me. As well as training and playing competitive football games, it is supporting my career aspirations of becoming a physiotherapist or a coach.

“In the classroom I’m learning a range of areas including anatomy, psychology and conditioning and fitness. On the pitch, female football is growing all the time, and the standard is improving with it. We’ve played and beaten Manchester City and Everton’s teams this year, so it is going really well.”

Harry Richardson, 19, was last year’s star award winner for the Burnley FC Shadow Youth Team, progressing on to Leeds Beckett University, where he now studies Science of Sport Performance.

Harry said: “The BFC Shadow Youth Team programme was definitely the best route for me. I love football and I always knew I wanted to work in sport, whether it was coaching, teaching, or in strength and conditioning. The fact I could study a BTEC and train and play football under high quality coaches was a win, win.

“In the classroom, the teaching was very good, and it really supported me to achieve my Triple Distinction* grade at the end of the course. Now I’m at university, I’m building on the knowledge I gained during my BTEC at College. Because I was from out of the immediate area when I went to College and didn’t know anybody, the progression to university has been quite simple for me as I had the confidence from doing it all before.”

Included within the £4million of improvements at Accrington and Rossendale College are brand new industry-standard Hair and Beauty salons, innovative study spaces, and a revamped specialist Learning Resource Centre.

There are also dedicated Learner Services and Careers areas and a remodelled and modern student Refectory. Coming soon is the redevelopment of the Construction and Automotive building and transformational green space creation to enhance the campus environment.

Applicants looking to apply to Accrington and Rossendale College still have the time. If you would like to apply to study at Accrington and Rossendale College, contact 01282 440272 or visit www.accross.ac.uk

Nelson and Colne College maintains place as one of country’s leading colleges

Nelson and Colne College has maintained its place as one of the leading colleges in the country, across a range of academic measures.

This year, Nelson and Colne College placed as the number one FE college in the country for A Level progress, and the leading college nationally for GCSE Mathematics progress, and third in the country for GCSE English progress. This indicates that our learners achieve better results based on their GCSE grades than they would do in any other college in the country.

Now the college has been named as number one in Lancashire for 16-18 Advanced Apprenticeships and is placed second in Lancashire for 16-18 classroom achievement in the newly published National Achievement Rate Tables. These new results are all the more exceptional as they now combine Nelson and Colne College and Accrington and Rossendale College results, following their successful merger in November 2018. The performance at the Nelson campus exceeds that of the group overall.

The publication of the Government data confirms what has been another excellent year of academic performance at Nelson and Colne College, which saw it achieve a stunning rise in the highest A*-A grades at A Level in 2019, and a five percentage point rise in the number of students achieving coveted A*-B grades.

Record numbers of A Level students progressed on to Russell Group and other leading universities, including Oxford and Cambridge, from Nelson and Colne College in 2019. The figure could be higher in 2020, with an even greater number of A Level and vocational students receiving conditional offers from Russell Group and leading universities, including Oxbridge.

Students who enter the college without a high grade in Mathematics or English GCSE will resit those qualifications. The success of those students in achieving these essential qualifications for university entrance or to get a good job is more than twice the national average, unlocking many higher level opportunities throughout life. The college has been shortlisted for a national award for its outstanding GCSE resit provision and the announcement is due in October.

Principal Amanda Melton said: “When you look at what Nelson and Colne College has achieved over the last 12 months, it’s absolutely outstanding. We have consistently been at the top end of the National Achievement Rate Tables for classroom achievement and Apprenticeships for several years, and we have never been higher in the performance tables with our A Level and GCSE progress.

“The consistent high-quality standard of education we are renowned for has been successfully sustained during a period of significant change for the college too with our merger with Accrington and Rossendale College just over 12 months ago, which makes our achievements even more impressive.

“Our continued success is testament to a whole college effort, and in particular our phenomenal teaching team who truly are the very best in their field. They ensure that students who attend Nelson and Colne College exceed their potential year in, year out.”

As well as academic measures, Nelson and Colne College is also the number one college in the country for student satisfaction, according to the latest FE Choices Learner Survey.

Michael Bromilow, 18, formerly of Park High School, is studying Computer Science, Mathematics, Further Mathematics and Physics. He said: “I have offers from Bath, Edinburgh, Lancaster, and York and I’m looking at going to study Natural Sciences or Maths and Physics.

“Computer Science is probably the subject that comes to me most naturally, but there is something about Maths and Physics that I really enjoy – they are the foundations of everything.

“I’ve loved my time at College – the teaching is excellent, I find the resources very good, there are places to study or socialise, and I’ve made some really good friends. The extracurricular offer is great too. I found the robotics good for my learning and I’ve really taken to archery, which is something I’ve never had the opportunity to try before.”

Marium Shafique, 21, began her journey at College on an ESOL course in 2015, before progressing to Level 1 Business and then straight to Level 3 when her tutor saw her potential. She now has offers to study at Lancaster, Liverpool and York universities.

Marium said: “When my family first moved to the area, Nelson and Colne College was recommended to us as the number one college. I have loved my time here and I have progressed so much in that time.

“I will miss it greatly when I go to university. I’ve loved the course content in Business, my teachers are brilliant and I never thought when I started I would gain offers to study at some leading business schools in the country.”

Applicants looking to apply to Nelson and Colne College or Accrington and Rossendale College still have the time. Contact 01282 440272 or visit www.nelson.ac.uk or www.accross.ac.uk to apply.

Accrington and Rossendale College goes from strength to strength as it celebrates rise in National Achievement Rate Tables

Accrington and Rossendale College is continuing to go from strength to strength – boosting its position in the newly published National Achievement Rate Tables following its successful merger with Nelson and Colne College.

Within 18 months of the merger, the shared benefits of joining forces with a leading College Group are coming to the fore, as Accrington and Rossendale College now sits with its partner as number one in Lancashire for 16-18 Advanced Apprenticeships.

For classroom achievement, at all ages and levels, Accrington and Rossendale College now places in the top five colleges nationally, building further on the dramatic improvements the college made in the 2019 tables.

The higher placings come soon after Accrington and Rossendale College achieved significant progress in the three main areas of inspection during a monitoring visit by Ofsted in October last year – a requirement of the merger – and at a time when a £4million transformation of the college campus enters its final phase.

Included within the redevelopment are brand new industry-standard Hair and Beauty salons, innovative study spaces, and a revamped specialist Learning Resource Centre. There are also dedicated Learner Services and Careers areas and a remodelled and modern student Refectory.

Coming soon is the redevelopment of the Construction and Automotive building and transformational green space creation to enhance the campus environment.

Principal of Nelson and Colne College Group Amanda Melton said: “This time last year, I said there was further ground that Accrington and Rossendale College could gain following the merger with Nelson and Colne College, and I think we have achieved that in a range of areas in the intervening 12 months.

“Whether it is in classroom learning, Apprenticeship achievement, significant progress with Ofsted or the complete modernisation of the Accrington and Rossendale College estate, the whole College Group has pulled together during a period of significant change to deliver the required positive improvements, and I’m very proud of this achievement.

“Our job now is to continue improving and to bring the extraordinary to Accrington, one of the many shared benefits of being in a leading College Group led by Nelson and Colne College.”

Kian Wilding, 18, has risen up through the levels in Carpentry and Joinery and is now a Level 3 Advanced Apprentice at Frank Anthony Kitchens in Blackburn. Kian, formerly of Hyndburn Academy, said: “I’ve always been hands on and Carpentry and Joinery is perfect for me – it’s a passion and I love it.

“I fit kitchens, work on bespoke jobs, and I enjoy developing my skills. There’s nothing better than completing a quality piece of work for a happy customer. I work with some amazing colleagues and a good employer and if there is anything I need at work then help is there.

“When I’m in College, I find the facilities are very good, my tutors are experienced and supportive, and they are also organised. I feel like I’m always on track and progressing in the right direction. I would definitely recommend Accrington and Rossendale College.”

Former St Augustine’s RC High School student Molly Simmonds, 18, who is studying Level 3 Health and Social Work Professions at Accrington and Rossendale College, said: “I really like the idea of working with elderly people as I think it is a very rewarding career.

“Accrington and Rossendale College has been great as the course content has been ideal, and I’ve had excellent careers advice. I’ve also had two work placements – one in a care home and one in an elderly ward at hospital – and these have really helped shape my career goal. My next step is to progress to the University of York to study Social Work.”

Applicants looking to apply to Accrington and Rossendale College still have the time. If you would like to apply to study at Accrington and Rossendale College, contact 01282 440272 or visit www.accross.ac.uk

Students: work hard, but remember you are more than an exam

They say a week is a long time in politics, and the same can be said in education too. I write this column during unprecedented times, and today’s publication marks two weeks since we at Nelson and Colne College Group took the extraordinary decision to mobilise our curriculum teams to entirely deliver teaching and learning online as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

The week of the switch from classroom to virtual delivery was extremely challenging, emotional and stressful for colleagues in all departments across College. Though our day to day lives have been turned upside down, it was an overhaul borne out of necessity, and an unwavering commitment to the education of our students and the community that we serve.

Uncertainty around exams and the award of qualifications followed, but we now have more clarity on this. The overall message is that students’ results are going to be largely based on teacher assessment. Students at College should be reassured that these decisions will fall to our phenomenal teachers, who are the best placed professionals to make such assessment on ability. They have a wealth of assessment information upon which to make an accurate judgement, and I’m reassured that the grades awarded will be a fair reflection.

Of course, exams and assessments are one measure of a student’s ability, and we have been encouraging students to continue to work hard in their studies to give a good account of themselves and ensure that any further progress achieved between now and the normal exam period is considered.

But we know that College students here at Nelson and Colne College Group are much more than a set of exam results. We develop well-rounded individuals that are ready for their next step in their careers. I want all of our students to remember this, especially those concerned about their immediate futures.

We create good citizens, with compassion, a willingness to help, and an understanding of the community around them. And it is a time to demonstrate just how good we are as citizens right now by supporting one another through this crisis.

We are in the middle of a national lockdown to protect the most vulnerable in society, and to allow our valuable NHS – of which many of our students will know through work placements with East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust – with the space it needs to support those suffering greatest with coronavirus.

Be good citizens, help those in the community who need it most, and above all, take care, stay safe, and stay at home if you can. Together we will weather this storm.

Until next month, best wishes. Amanda.

Students – Carry on studying.

I write this column during unprecedented times, and today’s publication marks two weeks since Nelson and Colne College Group, along with all schools and colleges nationally, mobilised our curriculum teams to entirely deliver teaching and learning online as a result of the national lockdown.

The week of the switch from classroom to online delivery was extremely challenging and emotional for colleagues and students in all departments across College. In many cases, this was our last few days with students heading to universities or jobs this autumn, and we felt we didn’t really have chance to properly say goodbye. I think our hopes to be back after the Easter holidays were unrealistic, though we remain optimistic that we can get back to our normal working practices soon. I’m sure we will be able to celebrate the achievement of this year’s departing students once this situation is behind us.

Though our day to day lives have been turned upside down, it was an overhaul borne out of necessity, and an unwavering commitment to the education of our students and the community that we serve. I’m really pleased that we managed to get our systems up and running to enable students, teachers and our support staff to operate remotely. I’m grateful to those very few staff members who continue to deliver our essential business continuity, so that we can all learn or work at home, be paid and pay our suppliers, and look after our premises in readiness for our return. 

A degree of uncertainty remains about summer exams. We expect more clarity in the coming days on how students will receive their grades, probably in July. The overall message is that students’ qualifications will be awarded based on how well they have performed and continue to perform outside of formal exams. In all cases we have encouraged those students due to complete at College this summer to continue to study, in order improve their skills and knowledge, and be in the best possible position to progress to university or into an Apprenticeship once this crisis has abated.

Our students typically make great progress in this final term, as they practice what they have learned, and consolidate their knowledge. We are doing everything we can to ensure that this progress is not lost. Our teaching teams are continuing to teach online, and all students know where they need to go to participate in learning and access learning and assessment materials. Our expectation is that all our students continue to engage with College, and we will make contact where that’s not happening.

In many cases we have had to address the needs of students who don’t have internet access at home, and in some cases provide a computer they can use during the day while parents are also working remotely.

We are in the middle of a national lockdown to protect the most vulnerable in society, and to protect our valuable NHS so that it can cope with the volume of patients needing treatment. I call on our students to abide by the guidance offered. Take daily exercise alongside your studies, but above all, stay at home to protect the NHS.

I wish you all good health in the weeks ahead.

Amanda

Inspiring learner and partner stories support Lancashire Adult Learning’s stellar Health and Wellbeing showcase

Inspiring learner and partner stories have supported Lancashire Adult Learning’s stellar showcase of Health and Wellbeing courses to influential healthcare professionals.

Current and prospective partner organisations from across the Red Rose County were invited to LAL’s latest social prescribing showcase at Northlight where they learned more about LAL’s wide range of Health and Wellbeing provision, and the different ways in which LAL can support organisations and learners.

Empowering tales of improved wellbeing from Lancashire Adult Learning learners who had completed courses including Art for Wellbeing and Chair Based Exercises were shared, and delegates invited to the event also heard inspiring stories from partner organisations of strong engagement in Health and Wellbeing courses.

Social prescribing is about connecting people to non-medical support in the community – an example being where education is prescribed as an alternative to medication, empowering people with the right tools to become self-managing and resilient.

Nicola Hall, Head of Curriculum and Strategic Partnerships, said: “I’m delighted that Lancashire Adult Learning is at the forefront of the incredibly important social prescribing agenda and that we are in a position to support adult learners right across the county’s 12 districts.

“Our social prescribing event was a real celebration of the tangible difference that Health and Wellbeing courses can make to the lives of Lancashire residents, and I’m looking forward to working together with key partners across the county to progress our valuable work further.”

Shamim Rahman, 30, from Burnley, was one of the learners to speak at the showcase. She said: “The course I am doing with LAL is at Linkbridge in Burnley. A community venue is accessible and much more relaxed for me and the course suits me perfectly too as art is my stress reliever.

“By completing the tasks and projects within the course, it gives me a feeling of warmth, pride and achievement. I have a wonderful tutor, I’ve learned new skills and made new friends, and the course has given me a great sense of belonging.”

Dr Sakthi Karunanithi, Director of Public Health for Lancashire, said: “Lancashire Adult Learning is an incredible community asset for the people of Lancashire. They can help with everything from living a healthier life to helping people develop critical skills for employment. What’s more, the courses are free of charge and they are accessible to all.

“This is going to be especially important now the health and care system joins up to work with organisations such as LAL, local authorities and community groups to promote caring for people in the communities in which they live.”

Julie Bell, Head of Libraries, Museums, Culture and Archives for Lancashire County Council said: “Public libraries have been around since the beginning of the 20th century and they have and continue to be the university on the street corner. We should never underestimate the power of what we do and we should celebrate that.

“Working with Lancashire Adult Learning enhances this as the courses offered through the partnership provides our customers with skills for life, and progression onwards and upwards in the world. The biggest and best medicine we can provide is connection, and that is what we do very well.

“The partnership we share with LAL is a real benefit to the communities of Lancashire and we are always looking at new courses and new ways to engage customers and attract new ones. The exciting thing looking into the future is that we have still got a whole lot of untapped potential through the partnership.”

Cosima Towneley, Lancashire County Councillor and Lead Member for Health, Wellbeing and Adult Services, said: “I’ve always thought that prevention is far preferable to prescription, and that is exactly where social prescribing fits perfectly.

“I found the Lancashire Adult Learning social prescribing event immensely useful, and the range of courses is extremely positive for people right across Lancashire who suffer with mental, physical or financial health difficulties.”

As well as its targeted delivery and partnership work, Lancashire Adult Learning offers a huge range of planned provision across the Red Rose County, from Arts and Crafts to Humanities classes, Languages to Health and Wellbeing sessions and Functional Skills English and Maths and Employability courses.

In February 2018, Lancashire Adult Learning was named as the inaugural winner of the national Adult and Community Learning Provider of the Year at the TES FE Awards.

Further information about Lancashire Adult Learning can be found at www.lal.ac.uk or by calling 0333 003 1717.

Hundreds attend Lancashire Adult Learning’s Community Wellbeing Day at Padiham Town Hall

Two hundred members of the public from Padiham and Burnley joined Lancashire Adult Learning’s drive to support people to socially prescribe.

Working in partnership with Burnley West Primary Care Network, the showcase event at Padiham Town Hall was the latest in a series of LAL roadshow events working with Primary Care Networks in Lancashire with the aim of encouraging members of the public to socially prescribe.

Social prescribing is about connecting people to non-medical support in the community – an example being where education is prescribed as an alternative to medication, empowering people with the right tools to become self-managing and resilient.

Visitors on the day included Lord Shuttleworth, and all had the chance to take part in ‘Have a go’ learning experiences including Healthier Microwave Cookery, Chair Based Exercises with Drumming, Mandala Stone Art, the Five Ways to Wellbeing, and First Aid, as well as Family Learning, Horticulture, Art and Singing, and Volunteering activities.

Those attending also had the chance to sign up to a wide range of Lancashire Adult Learning’s free Health and Wellbeing courses, as well as take up a free health check including blood pressure, blood glucose and weight measurement from a team of health professionals.

Nicola Hall, Head of Curriculum and Strategic Partnerships at Lancashire Adult Learning, said: “I’m absolutely thrilled at the response from the residents in Padiham and Burnley to our Community Wellbeing Day which was a huge success.

“The event was very well attended, and Padiham Town Hall was alive with around 200 members of the public participating in learning activities to improve their wellbeing.

“LAL’s aim is to help the people of Lancashire live longer, fuller and happier lives, and we are doing exactly that, with the support of Primary Care Networks like Burnley West and the great number of partner and community groups who attended the showcase adding value to the day.”

Dr James Fleming, Clinical Director of the Burnley West Primary Care Network, said: “As a local GP, I feel it is very important to get the basics right like smoking and exercise. As well as that though, we need to focus on our general wellbeing, which is what the day was about.

“There are so many services which are available to the public but they just don’t know about them. For example, the Padiham Community Choir is a fantastic way to help combat loneliness, promote community cohesion and learn something new at the same time. I wanted people to know about services which are free to access but can have a huge impact on health and wellbeing.

“If you could design a service from scratch that would support a community to improve its wellbeing, it would be exactly what Lancashire Adult Learning provides. When I was introduced to their work, I just couldn’t believe how relevant and wide ranging it was. I’ve wanted to do this for years and Lancashire Adult Learning have made this happen.”

Lord Shuttleworth said: “Health and Wellbeing is enormously important, and I think it is brilliant to see Lancashire Adult Learning and the NHS East Lancashire Clinical Commissioning Group working together to host such a wonderful event for the benefit of the community in Padiham and Burnley.

“I was aware of Lancashire Adult Learning’s work prior to attending the Community Wellbeing Event, but it has opened my eyes to the breadth of the offer and the ways in which adults right across Lancashire are supported by LAL and can access learning opportunities.”

Alice Binns, a member of the public attending the event, said: “I came to the wellbeing day with my sister, and I have been pleasantly surprised at the range of learning opportunities and community groups. It has been a very interesting experience and I have thoroughly enjoyed attending.”

Local organisations who joined the Lancashire Adult Learning team at the Health and Wellbeing event included Burnley FC in the Community; Burnley Leisure; Padiham Community Choir; Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale CVS; Lancashire Women; I Plato; Blind Society; Age UK; Cancer Care Team; Bowel Cancer; Slimming World; Steady On Team, Padiham Green Way; Male Carers’ Group; Virgin Care; Alzheimer’s Society.

Any businesses and organisations in Lancashire who would be interested in working with Lancashire Adult Learning’s Health and Wellbeing Team can contact Craig Pollard at c.pollard@lal.ac.uk.

As well as its targeted delivery and partnership work, Lancashire Adult Learning offers a huge range of planned provision across the Red Rose County, from Arts and Crafts to Humanities classes, Languages to Health and Wellbeing sessions and Functional Skills English and Maths and Employability courses.

In February 2018, Lancashire Adult Learning was named as the inaugural winner of the national Adult and Community Learning Provider of the Year at the TES FE Awards.

Further information about Lancashire Adult Learning can be found at www.lal.ac.ukor by calling 0333 003 1717.

New T Levels integral to Careers Week celebrations

We have been busy celebrating National Careers Week here at College, something which is integral to our intent as a career focused tertiary education provider.

As Principal, one of my key messages to staff and curriculum delivery teams is that our College is about positive destinations and not just qualifications. That is why our curriculum is designed to get our students career ready and we put incredible emphasis on the importance of providing students with work placements and exposure to what careers actually look like. Students don’t attend College to get parked in education or study which doesn’t directly lead to something better.

Having a career focused curriculum, and enjoying strong links with businesses and career opportunities, enables the College to place each student on the right programme for them based on their starting point and career aim. Students here have personally designed study programmes and learning experiences at all levels, and these are built around progress towards an end result and skill development.

Apprenticeships are the traditional example of a career focused qualification that is directly linked to a job or career at the end of it. With the introduction of new T Level qualifications here at Nelson and Colne College Group from September in Digital and Education and Childcare, it is a new opportunity to provide additional technical career pathways to students in Pendle and the surrounding areas. This is why I am so keen for the T Level curriculum to be successful.

Within a T Level, students benefit from an in-depth work placement of at least 315 hours, which equates to a minimum of 45 days. This allows a student to make impact while on their work placement, and learn new skills and roles that are directly related to their programme of study. They are not with an employer just to do photocopying or do the office brew round.

Off the back of the introduction for T Levels, I think employers have a role to play in encouraging young people into jobs linked to the economy locally. One of the things that we know is that young people are strongly affected by the positive experiences that they have. For example, a day in an engineering workshop can inspire a career in engineering much more readily than when a student is sitting in a classroom learning about it.

Through my work with the Lancashire Skills and Employment Hub, I see the great work that the Enterprise Adviser Network do in bringing closer together the worlds of education and work. Anyone who might be interested in supporting this important work can visit www.lancashireskillshub.co.uk. Employers seeking to get involved with supporting the implementation of T Levels and work placements can contact the College directly at marketing@nelson.ac.uk.

Until next month, Amanda.

New T Levels integral to Careers Week celebrations

We have been busy celebrating National Careers Week here at College, something which is integral to our intent as a career focused tertiary education provider.

As Principal, one of my key messages to staff and curriculum delivery teams is that our College is about positive destinations and not just qualifications. That is why our curriculum is designed to get our students career ready and we put incredible emphasis on the importance of providing students with work placements and exposure to what careers actually look like. Students don’t attend College to get parked in education or study which doesn’t directly lead to something better.

Having a career focused curriculum, and enjoying strong links with businesses and career opportunities, enables the College to place each student on the right programme for them based on their starting point and career aim. Students here have personally designed study programmes and learning experiences at all levels, and these are built around progress towards an end result and skill development.

Apprenticeships are the traditional example of a career focused qualification that is directly linked to a job or career at the end of it. With the introduction of new T Level qualifications here at Nelson and Colne College Group from September in Digital and Education and Childcare, it is a new opportunity to provide additional technical career pathways to students in Pendle and the surrounding areas. This is why I am so keen for the T Level curriculum to be successful.

Within a T Level, students benefit from an in-depth work placement of at least 315 hours, which equates to a minimum of 45 days. This allows a student to make impact while on their work placement, and learn new skills and roles that are directly related to their programme of study. They are not with an employer just to do photocopying or do the office brew round.

Off the back of the introduction for T Levels, I think employers have a role to play in encouraging young people into jobs linked to the economy locally. One of the things that we know is that young people are strongly affected by the positive experiences that they have. For example, a day in an engineering workshop can inspire a career in engineering much more readily than when a student is sitting in a classroom learning about it.

Through my work with the Lancashire Skills and Employment Hub, I see the great work that the Enterprise Adviser Network do in bringing closer together the worlds of education and work. Anyone who might be interested in supporting this important work can visit www.lancashireskillshub.co.uk. Employers seeking to get involved with supporting the implementation of T Levels and work placements can contact the College directly at marketing@nelson.ac.uk.

Until next month, Amanda.

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